Is My Memory Loss Normal?

Font size Smaller Size Bigger Size Email a Friend Email To A Friend Print Print Page

Short term memory loss is a normal, but often frustrating, result of aging. As we get older, it's all too common to have trouble remembering seemingly simple things, like where we left the ketchup, or what we had for breakfast, while long-term memory remains easily accessible. This can leave us feeling scatterbrained and ineffective.

The brain functions by storing events in short term memory, then processing them and storing them in long term memory. Natural side effects of aging can short-circuit this process, making us lose some of the information in short term memory, and thus causing short term memory loss.

Aging and Memory Loss

Aging leads to a certain amount of brain cell loss, which can affect the ability to remember. As we age, our brains also produce less of certain chemicals that help the brain function to its best ability. This “slowing down” of normal mental function is normal, but it also can be countered, improving your brain's natural function and reducing memory loss.

Maintaining good health, a nutritious diet, and staying active on both a physical and mental level can greatly reduce these effects of aging. Studies have even shown that learning a musical instrument or a new language, or other similarly demanding pursuits, can help reduce the probability of developing age-related dementia or Alzheimer's. Learn about brain fitness exercises.

In addition, several natural supplements have been discovered that can enhance your ability to remember and to process information, strengthening your memory and increasing your natural brain function.

Causes of Memory Loss

Aside from aging, several other factors can contribute to this kind of memory loss. Stress and the pressures of everyday life can inhibit your brain's ability to process all the things that happen in a day. Short term memory is only able to hold a certain amount of information, so when we're overwhelmed by hectic, busy schedules, overwork, and the stress that comes along with them, some information gets lost, making our short term memory less reliable.

While a certain amount of memory loss is common and normal as we get older, if you find your memory loss bothersome or feel it's more severe than it should be, consult your doctor. Occasionally, short term memory loss can be related to other, more serious conditions such as head injury, illness or infection, so it's important to rule these out in case you're in need of medical care.

Fighting Memory Loss

Certain nutrients and supplements can help improve your brain function and reduce memory loss. Constant Focus provides a variety of ingredients that increase blood flow to the brain, reduce stress, and help prevent the breakdown of important neurotransmitters, thus increasing brain function and reducing memory loss.

These ingredients include Ginkgo biloba to increase circulation as well as mental focus, Vinpocetine to improve memory and repair damage to brain cells, and Huperzia serrata to prevent neurotransmitter breakdown. In combination, these and other ingredients in Constant Focus provide important compounds to help keep your brain functioning at its optimal ability.